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 1 
 on: October 25, 2014, 10:40:57 AM 
Started by PhilG - Last post by Alan
Does anyone use a Bokeh system?  http://www.bokehmasterskit.com/

I saw them on eBay for £20 for the full kit
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Bokeh-Masters-Kit-by-DIY-Photography-Unique-Special-Effects-System-/120795722484

 2 
 on: October 25, 2014, 10:33:37 AM 
Started by PhilG - Last post by Alan
It looks fine Alan. The range of optical zoom (22.3mm through to a tele end of 580mm) looks good for most purposes and the reviews are generally good. Getting it from a friend means that you know about its history.

It's even better than I thought.
I can seamlessly add two photos on one frame on the camera, so the wide becomes 17mm as a full frame.

As a letterbox, and 180 degrees 3 frames together gives a seamless image  with the same cat in all 3 bits, if I want :o all on the camera, with no post production.

The camera has two macros. A good basic macro and a super 1cm macro  ;D

 3 
 on: October 15, 2014, 07:03:02 PM 
Started by PhilG - Last post by nigel
It looks fine Alan. The range of optical zoom (22.3mm through to a tele end of 580mm) looks good for most purposes and the reviews are generally good. Getting it from a friend means that you know about its history.

 4 
 on: October 15, 2014, 04:37:57 PM 
Started by PhilG - Last post by Alan
I took the plunge!

I was taking about cameras to a friend who offered me his unused, year old, Pentax X-5 bridge camera and kit for £80! It had only been used twice as it does not shoot RAW and my friend normally uses RAW on his Canon 5D mkIII.

Having played within for a week, and read the 228 page Pentax user manual, I think it's just right for me.

http://www.ricoh-imaging.co.uk/en/digital-bridgecameras/X5.html




 5 
 on: September 30, 2014, 09:39:52 AM 
Started by PhilG - Last post by nigel
That article looks, at a quick reading, to be sensible and to give good advice.

If you want detailed pictures of wildlife then I don't think there is really an alternative to a DSLR with a large sensor array, because you would have a good range of lenses available. You should always try to frame the picture as you wish, while taking it, in order to avoid the need for cropping. If you want the best resolution then choose a camera which will take photographs in RAW or TIFF format without compression. You can convert to JPEG when you have done all the manipulation and still store the RAW image. Other things you should consider are a good rigid tripod and remote triggering.

I used to use a large format film camera but nowadays I only take pictures for my own satisfaction and I'm currently using a four or five year old Canon EOS digital.

If you want the best, then I'm afraid you have to pay for it. ;)

 6 
 on: September 29, 2014, 09:20:48 PM 
Started by PhilG - Last post by Alan
I just read this on sensors and it looks like size does matter and it not just megapixels!  :o
Now I'm really confused  :'(
http://www.gizmag.com/camera-sensor-size-guide/26684/

 7 
 on: September 29, 2014, 03:27:41 PM 
Started by PhilG - Last post by chris57
I bought a camera from here once Alan.  http://www.pixmania.co.uk/flash.html?ectrans=1#srcid=12412

 8 
 on: September 29, 2014, 03:03:40 PM 
Started by PhilG - Last post by Alan
Nigel Etal,

I've found these people with great prices on cameras.

http://www.eglobalcentral.co.uk/

Can you see any problems?

 9 
 on: September 29, 2014, 02:48:19 PM 
Started by PhilG - Last post by Alan
Nigel,

Thanks for the link. :)

I'm not too sure what I'm really looking for.  :'( I don't want a professional camera, but I want more than a basic point and shoot. I'm not sure of a compact camera would have a high optical magnification, for wildlife, so I might be thinking about a bridge camera..... ::)

Just had a quick look at bridge cameras and they seem to be more the ticket.... But....so much choice, such a range of makes, magnification and fancy bits.....now I'm really confused  :'(

 10 
 on: September 29, 2014, 09:36:35 AM 
Started by PhilG - Last post by nigel
I'm a bit out of touch with current models Alan, but a very good bit of general advice is to ensure that you buy one with a proper viewfinder that doesn't rely on the screen, otherwise it is virtually impossible to take photographs in bright sunlight.

If it is a compact camera you're looking for then there are some listed here http://snapsort.com/roundups/compact-digital-cameras-viewfinder  in descending order of price.

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